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Posts for category: Psoriasis

By contactus@sherylclarkmd.com
March 23, 2014
Category: Psoriasis

Patients with chronic plaque psoriasis get better when they lose weight via a low-calorie diet:

Diet improves tx response in obese with plaque psoriasis

Educating patients about the importance of dietary fiber
 

Patients with chronic stable plaque-type psoriasis who lose weight by adopting lifestyle changes appear to respond better to psoriasis treatment, according to study findings from Thailand.

In addition, quality of life, triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels also improved with the lifestyle modifications, including a low-calorie diet. Previous studies have shown the relative risk of psoriasis is directly related to body mass index (BMI), and positive correlation exists between psoriasis severity and BMI.

Dermatologist From Upper East Side NY Explains Psoriasis, Metabolic Syndrome in Psoriasis , Psoriasis Severity Predicts Other Diseases, Psoriasis and Crohn's Disease ,The Size of Your Tonsils is Related to Psoriasis Severity, Psoriasis

http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/diet-improves-tx-response-in-obese-with-plaque-psoriasis/article/338561/?DCMP=EMC-CA_UPDATE&cpn=eliqcard&dl=0&spMailingID=8185967&spUserID=MTE3MTc4MTE4MjAS1&spJobID=261644617&spReportId=MjYxNjQ0NjE3S0

By contactus@sherylclarkmd.com
October 14, 2013
Category: Psoriasis
Tags: comorbid disease  

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine confirm a link between psoriasis and peripheral vascular disease and cardiovascular disease, as well as demonstrate some new associations including peptic ulcer disease, arthriitis other than psoriatic arthritis, and kidney disease. it also shows that the risk is higher with more severe psoriasis.

confirm an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease and validate the link between psoriasis severity and risk for other disease. Some relatively new associations are demonstrated, including with peptic ulcer disease, renal disease, and rheumatologic disease other than psoriatic arthritis. - See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/na32085/2013/09/13/psoriasis-and-co-morbid-disease-dose-response-relation#sthash.m2zzDhha.dpuf
confirm an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease and validate the link between psoriasis severity and risk for other disease. Some relatively new associations are demonstrated, including with peptic ulcer disease, renal disease, and rheumatologic disease other than psoriatic arthritis. - See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/na32085/2013/09/13/psoriasis-and-co-morbid-disease-dose-response-relation#sthash.m2zzDhha.dpuf
Psoriasis and Co-Morbid Disease: A Dose Response in Relation to Psoriasis Severity
www.jwatch.org

 

http://www.jwatch.org/na32085/2013/09/13/psoriasis-and-co-morbid-disease-dose-response-relation

confirm an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease and validate the link between psoriasis severity and risk for other disease. Some relatively new associations are demonstrated, including with peptic ulcer disease, renal disease, and rheumatologic disease other than psoriatic arthritis. - See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/na32085/2013/09/13/psoriasis-and-co-morbid-disease-dose-response-relation#sthash.Zdaja8QN.dpuf
By contactus@sherylclarkmd.com
October 22, 2012
Category: Psoriasis
Tags: inflammation  

Patients with psoriasis are almost nine times more likely to have enlarged tonsils, compared with patients without psoriasis, according to the results of a small study by Dr. Marianna Shvartsbeyn and her coinvestigators, reported at the American Academy of Dermatology’s Summer Academy Meeting. The study was supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

Patients with psoriasis were found to have had an odds ratio of 8.77 for having enlarged tonsils (grade 2 or greater), compared with healthy controls. Tonsillar size also was significantly larger in patients with psoriasis (mean tonsil grade, 1.78), than in control patients (mean tonsil grade, 0.86); the severity of psoriasis was positively associated with tonsil size, Dr. Shvartsbeyn and her colleagues reported.

Limited clinical data have suggested that there is an association between enlarged tonsils and inflammatory skin disease. Small studies have shown that among patients with psoriasis, the skin lesions disappeared or improved after tonsillectomy."Our hypothesis is that in chronic tonsillar hypertrophy, bacterial species that reside in the tonsils are released into the circulation and cause stimulation of T cells. As a result of this constant chronic stimulation, an autoreactive clone may be formed. The auto-clone may produce an antibody attacking the skin and drive inflammatory response. In some individuals, this exaggerated immune response may manifest as psoriasis," the investigators wrote.

And although there is empirical evidence "that tonsillectomy improved skin lesions in patients with psoriasis..., further studies are needed." Dr. Shvartsbeyn noted in an interview.

For more information, go to: http://www.skinandallergynews.com/index.php?id=1059&type=98&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=136913&cHash=da03e20e36

and visit my library: Psoriasis

By Sheryl Clark, MD
August 24, 2012
Category: Psoriasis
Tags: Crohn's Disease  

We already know that psoriasis is associated with heart attacks, stroke, and metabolic syndrome. A new study from the NIH, which followed 174,646 patients over time, suggests the Crohn's disease, another inflammatory disease, is four times more likely in patients with psoriasis than in individuals without psoriasis.

Metabolic Syndrome in Psoriasis

Psoriasis

http://www.skinandallergynews.com/index.php?id=159&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=134185&cHash=4feb136dc5ebeb1d41412a0460107440

By Sheryl Clark MD
October 14, 2011
Category: Psoriasis

Evidence is mounting that there is a link between psoriasis and the metabolic syndrome.  Obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and increased lipids occur more commonly in those with psoriasis. A recent study in the Archives of Dermatology found that 40% of US adults with psoriasis had the metabolic syndrome (Thorvader et al, Arch Dermatol/vol 147, no 4, Apr 2011).

My patients with psoriasis are screened for high blood pressure or serum lipids, diabetes, and obesity (especially truncal obesity, where fat accumulates around the waist).

If you have psoriasis, please see your doctor yearly to screen for these abnormalities.